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Archive for November, 2015

Tomorrow’s Refugee Crisis Response event, ‘What Can Scotland Do?’ will now take place in LG.09 David Hume Tower.

All other details remain unchanged:

What: What Can Scotland Do?
Where: LG.09, David Hume Tower, EH8 9JX
When: Tuesday 1 December, from 5.15pm
Full details: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/refugee-crisis-response-what-can-scotland-do-tickets-19528483219

There are a handful of tickets still available!

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Please come along to the Global Justice Academy Refugee Response Event ‘What can Scotland do?’ on 1 Dec. Further details below.

Date: Tuesday 1 Dec 2015
Time: 5:15pm-7:00pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 3, Appleton Tower, The University of Edinburgh, Crichton Street, Edinburgh EH8 9LE

This event provides an opportunity to see the short documentary produced by LIVED, entitled ‘Learning to Swim’, about Syrian children living in a refugee camp and other areas of Jordon. The event will also include speakers from a range of voluntary organisations discussing what they are doing to help those who have been forced to flee persecution and conflict. The audience will be invited to discuss what they might do to help those fleeing persecution, particularly in the context of the current situation in Syria and related refugee ‘crisis’, and be challenged to take individual or collective actions to help.

Please register at the following link:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/refugee-crisis-response-what-can-scotland-do-tickets-19528483219

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Workshop: The concept of ‘national indifference’ and its potential to nations and nationalism research
5-6 September 2016

Convenors: Maarten Van Ginderachter (Antwerp University) and Michal Kopecek (Charles University Prague)
Venue: Charles University Prague

CfP. Deadline: 31 January 2016
This workshop welcomes conceptual contributions and case studies on the issue of national indifference from across the field of the humanities and the social sciences. The aim is to publish an edited volume with an international academic publisher or a themed issue of an international academic journal.

Successful applicants will have their accommodation costs completely covered and their travel expenses reimbursed. In exchange participants will give the right of first publication to the organisers of the workshop.

Papers will be refereed at the workshop by Pieter Judson (EUI – Firenze), James M. Brophy (University of Delaware), Jeremy King (Mount Holyoke College) and Tara Zahra (University of Chicago).

Please send a 500 word abstract of your paper to Maarten.VanGinderachter@uantwerpen.be and kopecek@usd.cas.cz. Deadline is 31 January 2016.

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Roundtable on the 2015 Canadian Federal Election

Thursday 26 November, 1:00-2:00 pm

Seminar Room 2, Crystal Macmillan Building

The recent Canadian federal election brought to an end nine years of Conservative party rule. The election of the Liberal party was dramatic: it secured 184 seats, a fivefold increase from the previous federal election. The incoming prime minister, Justin Trudeau has acted swiftly in marking his administration as distinct, not least with the appointment of a cabinet that is gender equal and that reflects Canadian diversity more generally. We are fortunate to have Professor Jocelyn Létourneau, a leading Canadian historian and political commentator, from Laval University in Quebec City, who will offer his analysis. Professor Ailsa Henderson, head of Politics and International Relations, and Dr James Kennedy, Director, Centre of Canadian Studies, both at the University of Edinburgh, will respond.

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Historical Sociology has long been linked with a ‘bellicist’ tradition in social theory, especially in its neo-Weberian mode. Its initial adoption by International Relations scholars was partially due to the attention paid by scholars such as Giddens, Mann, Tilly and Skocpol in terms of the focus on the international as a realm of geopolitical competition, and its concurrent effects on and interactions with states and societies. The focus on war as part of the process of state-building became entrenched in the IR literature (if not a dominant mode of thinking about war). Furthermore, Mann and Shaw have both produced rich accounts of the role of militarism as part of the constitution of modern societies.

However, as the neo-Weberian forms of historical sociology became subject to increased scrutiny for their relatively narrow account of the international, the focus on war was less pronounced within historical sociological accounts of IR. Despite playing a role in sociologies of collective action, the scholarship in IR has moved increasingly away from an account of historicised dynamics of war and society. As such, a reintegration of these concerns is a potential area of renewal within the Historical Sociology of IR. The study of the micro-dynamics of war, its cultural and social contexts, etc. have increased in the field, but there has been less reflection on its historicity and interrelations with other dimensions of the international such as political economy and diplomacy.

The proposed panel seeks to reconnect the sociology of war with its history, drawing on newer sociologies of war, but also seeking to revisit and rethink the links with past scholarship. The panel invites contributions from any theoretical perspective within the broad remit of historical sociology looking at various dimensions of war and violence: practices, structures, organization and lineages.

Possible paper topics include:

• Revisions or critiques of standard historical sociological models of war/state-making

• Application of historical sociology to war/state-making in novel forms

• The application of war/state-building models to more recent cases

• Non-statist, historical sociologies of war and violence

• Historical sociological treatments of war and violence as rivals for mainstream explanations (e.g. political science)

• Historical sociology and technologies of war: battle-spaces; high-tech war; insurgency and counter-insurgency; revolution and revolutionary war

Please send paper proposals to: Bryan Mabee – b.mabee@qmul.ac.uk.

The deadline for panel submissions is Nov. 27.

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Is the Global Refugee Regime Fit for Purpose?

Where: Lecture Theatre 3, Appleton Tower

When: 24 November 2015, 5.15pm-7pm

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/refugee-crisis-response-is-the-global-refugee-regime-fit-for-purpose-tickets-19469761581

This is the second of three Refugee Crisis Response Events organised in collaboration between the Global Justice Academy, the School of Law, the School of Social and Political Sciences, IASH, the Global Development Academy, the Centre of African Studies, and EUSA.

Confirmed Panelists:

Amal Azzudin (Mental Health Foundation/Glasgow Girls)
Jamie Kerr (Thorntons Solicitors)
Christina Boswell (University of Edinburgh)
Lucy Lowe (University of Edinburgh)


What Can Scotland Do?
Where: Lecture Theatre 3, Appleton Tower

When: 1 Dec 2015, 5:15pm-7:00pm

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/refugee-crisis-response-what-can-scotland-do-tickets-19528483219

This event provides an opportunity to see the short documentary produced by LIVED, entitled ‘Learning to Swim’, about Syrian children living in a refugee camp and other areas of Jordan. The event will also include speakers from a range of voluntary organisations discussing what they are doing to help those who have been forced to flee persecution and conflict. The audience will be invited to discuss what they might do to help those fleeing persecution, particularly in the context of the current situation in Syria and related refugee ‘crisis’, and be challenged to take individual or collective actions to help.

Confirmed panelists:

Elise Marshall (Freedom from Torture)
Jon Busby (Welcoming Association)
Graham O’Neill (Scottish Refugee Council)
Representative from the Refugee Survival Trust

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